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Morning Camp


This morning I christen my Coleman stove with bacon grease at first light. The songbirds of the Smokies begin their first chorus against the white noise of frying meat. I let the first couple of pieces get maybe too done in my grandma's black iron frying pan, but that's how I like it. I turn down the fire and the rest of the thick- cut bacon comes out perfect. I save some of the grease in the bottom of the pan for eggs.


I break six eggs in a large paper cup and stir in some half and half from the cooler. I mix them well into a creamy light yellow and pour them into the dark grease in the frying pan. As the eggs cook, they take on some of the dark color from the black pan and burned bacon pieces, but they turn out well.


Bringing water to boil on the other eye, I throw in a heaping handful of good ground coffee into the French press. I pour in the water and press the plunger down, watching the dark liquid swirl into a creamy head. The first sip from my cup has the aroma and flavor of the woods and the nearby river. 


My wife and girls are lured from their beds by the smell of breakfast, and the ceremony of morning camp is underway. So many things to do today, but for now, we breathe it all in: the mountains, the river, the sunlight through the trees, and the smell of bacon, eggs and coffee, and how blessed we are to be sitting around a camp table, sharing this time together.


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